Native Americans of San Miguel Arcángel

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San Miguel was the second mission established in the land of the Salinan people, six years after San Antonio de Padua. The Salinan, thought to number almost 3000 at the time of European contact, were hunter-gatherers .

INDIAN WOMAN GATHERING ACORNS

INDIAN WOMAN GATHERING ACORNS
Hutchings' California Magazine, 1859

The Spanish found the Salinan a "friendly and charitable people" who adapted easily to mission life.

DRAWING OF CALIFORNIA NATIVE

DRAWING OF CALIFORNIA NATIVE
J.W. Audubon c. 1849

In the mission era the natives who became neophytes at San Antonio de Padua were called Antoniaños; those associated with San Miguel were known as Migueleños. San Miguel also recruited some Yokuts and Chumash. 1/ 500

The Salinan population, estimated at "fewer than 700" by 1831 declined even more rapidly after secularization. 1

  • 1. "Salinan" pp 500 - 504, by Thomas Roy Hester in Volume 8 CALIFORNIA in Handbook of North American Indians, Smithsonian Institute: Washington D.C., 1978